2015-05-cover

The Night Before

april-1986

What am I doing here? And why did I decide that this was the race to “go for it?” Now I just wish I were at home between my own sheets with hyperactive bladder and bowels and cold sweaty feet and hands. Most of all, I wish that tomorrow held something other than an early rise and a day of exceedingly painful effort. Ah, well. close the eyes, breath deeply, and please, please, go to sleep.

May/June 2015

  • The Efficiency Factor in Running by Joe Friel
  • Training for an Ultra on a Busy Schedule by Ellie Greenwood
  • Downhill Training by Ian Sharman
  • Low-Tech Hydration by Dean Karnazes
  • Longevity and Ultra Racing by Joe Uhan
  • The Boring Ultrarunner by Gary Cantrell
  • Make Your Run a Reunion by Gary Dudney


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Recent Features

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This was my third time running the Hilo to Volcano 50K, as I had also participated in the 2004 and 2005 events. My flight from Portland, OR, arrived late Friday, January 2nd, in Hilo, Hawaii. After a few hours’ sleep, it was time to get up and ready fo

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How Much Walking?

Some runners may be sensitive enough to their body’s rhythms and needs that they will instinctively know when it’s time for a walk. They are fortunate, and I don’t want to change their successful methods. Many of us, though, are fairly new to the game. and we don’t have an established sense of pace. However, it is not hard to plan and execute a race when a few simple calculations are made.

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Gerardo Ramirez and Rene Villalobos demonstrate ultra camaraderie at Heartland 100. Photo by Rick Kent/Mile 90 Photography

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